Cochiti Potter with a Sense of Humor

Friday, May 28, 2021 1:24 PM

Cochiti Potter with a Sense of Humor

Some people have a sense of humor, some don’t. I’ve always found that it was a lot more fun hanging around with someone that did. A person I’d like to spend time with is Cochiti Pueblo potter Martha Arquero. Almost all her work captures the funny bone of the human spirit.

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Dean Haungooah: Traditional Pueblo Pottery Patterns with a Contemporary Look

The Bear is important to the Tewa people. When the Tewa left Chaco Canyon on their trek to the Rio Grande, they were out of water. They found the tracks of a bear and followed them to a stream that comes into the area where Santa Clara now stands. They could hear the water before they saw it, and they named the stream, translated into English, "Singing Water.”

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Zia Pottery Tiles

Thursday, May 6, 2021 9:36 AM

Zia Pottery Tiles

Elizabeth Medina was born in Jemez in 1956 and later married Marcellus Medina and moved to his pueblo of Zia.  We just received a new collection of these pieces.

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Hopi Elder Lawrence Namoki

Saturday, May 1, 2021 4:45 PM

Hopi Elder Lawrence Namoki

In 2011, near the end of the Mayan Calendar, I ran into Lawrence Namoki while pumping gas into my car in Tuba City where the road intersects to take visitors south to the Hopi Mesa.

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She Saved 18 Lives

Saturday, April 24, 2021 4:14 PM

She Saved 18 Lives

The year was 1912 and conditions were critical at the Neglected Mine, high in the LaPlata Mountains of Southwest Colorado. Eighteen miners were stranded without food in freezing temperatures with ten feet of snow on the ground. The angel who came to save them was 5’4” tall and weighed about 130 pounds.

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Revival Weaving by Laverne Van Winkle

Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:51 PM

Revival Weaving by Laverne Van Winkle

Being a judge at the Gallup Ceremonial is a special honor. And not being discriminatory, I think that the weaving category is the most exciting.If you have been to the Santa Fe Indian Market, one of the things you will notice is that there are not many booths that feature Navajo weaving. That isn’t to say that some of the best weavers don’t show there. They do, but the number is limited.

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Persian Turquoise in a Navajo Squash Blossom

Saturday, April 10, 2021 3:31 PM

Persian Turquoise in a Navajo Squash Blossom

I believe that the Squash Blossom necklace is one the most beautiful jewelry designs in the history of the world!

How’s that for a strong opinion?

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0 Comment Posted in Jewelry
Water Bird, Peyote Bird: The Evolution of Jewelry

Back in the ‘60s and early ‘70s, when there was an explosion of interest in Southwest Indian jewelry, the Pueblo of Zuni was a very busy place. Silver and lapidary artists made jewelry as fast as they could and still couldn’t satisfy the market.

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1 Comment Posted in Jewelry

Juan Nakai

Saturday, April 3, 2021 1:57 PM

Juan Nakai

Today I am going to share a story with you about a man I never knew. He was a wonderful artist who captured the beauty of the Navajo reservation as well as anyone has.

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Native American Crosses

Friday, March 26, 2021 1:36 PM

Native American Crosses

When the Spanish came to the Southwest, their mission was the three Gs: Gold, Glory and God. They used to teach that in school!

Gold, and riches, were the number one objective for the conquistadors.

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A Child's Beaded Jacket and Purse by Juanita Longknife Lefthand Tucker

Barbara Wells had an unusual childhood. Her father, J.W. “Duke” Wellington, was the superintendent of the Fort Belknap/Rocky Boy Reservations from 1946 - 1954. The Fort Belknap Reservation is shared by two Native American tribes, the Gros Ventre and the Assiniboine, a tribe belonging to the linguistic family of the Sioux.

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How I Learned the History of Navajo Weaving

Thursday, March 11, 2021 12:44 PM

How I Learned the History of Navajo Weaving

Gilbert Maxwell’s book Navajo Rugs, Past, Present and Future, which was published in 1963, was my first introduction to reading about Navajo weaving. I was 20 years old and had grown up around weaving, so I had a basic understanding of the art form.

But I really didn’t have a clue about its history.

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